Tuesday, 7 March 2017

Glasgow Necropolis

The Boyfriend and me, have been up to Glasgow for the week. On Saturday morning first on my itinerary was Glasgow's infamous Necropolis, I've been wanting to visit for years. The morning was damp and chilly. The weather was gloomy and a grey morning, which created the perfect lighting for some photography.

I feel like a cliche a goth in a cemetery doing photography, I loved every moment.

Surprisingly, in the early 19th century the necropolis was a public arboretum and park. In 1832, the law changed regarding burials, previously it had been the parish's responsibility to bury the dead. With the cultural shift and expanding population the ever growing need and desires to establish the cemetery. In Glasgow, The Merchant House oversaw the planning, starting in 1831, and George Mylne was appointed in charge of the landscaping and work was completed by 1832. The intention for the burial was to be interdenominational for everyone of any religion to be interred. The first interment was a Jewish burial of Joseph Levi in the same year as it opened, In 1833, Elizabeth Miles the first Christian interment. As Glasgow's population expanded the Necropolis grew to cope with the demands. Fortunately, there were meticulous records about the deaths which indicate possibly 50,000 people are buried and with over 3,500 marked tombs.

There are serval ways to enter the Necropolis, I entered from the main gate entrance and The "Bridge of Sighs", the original route the funeral procession took. The entrance was designed by brothers, David and James Hamilton, which was built in 1836.



This entrance way allowed for the most stunning views of the cemeteries convoluted and meanders on a hill that offers some great views of the city .


 

For me, cemeteries usually feel rather solemn and almost sad. However, it felt quite serene and relaxing walking around.  I normally don't feel like this when I walk through them. I think it's particularly how immaculately the grounds are maintained it felt like they tenderly loved. What was nice the balance of the trimmed grounds and more of the wild plants were allowed to grow, such as, the  ivy. 



As I followed around the pathway the cemetery I couldn't resist snapping the fanatasic views. 


Each tomb had a myriad of styles some were simple and others more elaborate with each telling its own story and memory of the person interned.  Each of the tombs were beautiful pieces of artwork of design and exquisite examples of masonry skills. A number of the headstones were designed by famous Scottish architects including,  Alexander ‘Greek’ Thomson, JT Rochead and even Charles Rennie Macintosh.

I've taken numerous of photographs but I've only included my favourites and most distinctive graves stones.  
































14 comments:

  1. That is a very very beautiful cemetery �� My husband and I would like to visit Scotland some day, so I'll keep this on my mind..

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  2. It was gorgeous place. Scotland is a beautiful county to visit and everybody is very friendly.

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  3. Gorgeous photographs and wonderful history 🙂

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  4. Thanks. Glad you found it interesting

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  5. Beautiful photos! I will be travelling to Glasgow next week and the Necropolis is on my list to see! Do you have any other awesome tips for a goth tourist in Glasgow? :)

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    1. I have a few recommendations, obliviously, I'll recommend the Necropolis and The Glasgow Cathedral which is literally a short walk from the Necropolis. The Hunterian museum( this is ok but still worth a quick look, and the exhibition of the Antonine Wall is interesting) and the art gallery has some wonderful Impressionist and Dutch masterworks if you into that. The University's architecture is a fantastic example of gothic revival and worth seeing alone. The Kelvingrove museum was the best it's very much a typical Victorian-style museum with a range of exhibitions, including a small exhibition on Charles Rennie Mactinsoh and they have Dali's Christ of St John of the Cross. I would highly recommend this museum, plus there is a Bru Dog across on the opposite of the road if you're into traditional ales. I was recommended The Mackintosh House, due to time constraints I didn't visit.

      Shopping ( I didn't much shopping) there is an alt' shop called Osiris I can't comment as I never visited it but I wasn't too impressed by the pictures. I went to Mandors Fabric Store, they stocked some lovely Halloween fabrics leftovers. Around the corner, was a Cancer UK charity shop that stocked some nice items.

      There is s a goth night, Alyssum, but that's only once a month, and the next one is the 25th March, They have a rock club called the Cat House, from some of the reviews I read it, sounds ok.

      Public transport depending on where you're staying it may be worth getting a bus pass for the First buses for £4.50 for the day. Make sure you have the exact money as they don't give change, a bit crap.

      I hope this has helped, anyway enjoy your the trip it sounds good.

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    2. Thank you so much! These tips are great! :)

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    3. Enjoy your trip and glad my tip will help.

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  6. Sounds like a brilliant trip. I've only been to Glasgow once and didn't have time to go there but it's a really interesting city.

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    1. It was a great, I loved it, getting away and having bit of quality time with the other half, always good.

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  7. What a beautiful place! I shall have to go someday! Now to afford they holiday....

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    1. If you ever do you should visit Newcastle, I have a guest
      bedroom lol

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  8. What a Gorgeous place! Wow!! Thank you for sharing and thanks for the history!

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    1. Thansks, it was a great place to visit.

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